Posts Tagged ‘Everglades’

Posted at June 25, 2011 by Comments Off

Roseate Spoonbill nests decrease

This is the third in Quirky Flamingo's series on how Everglades Restoration would change the wildlife and landscape of South Florida's River of Grass: A 2010 study overlooked by the local media shows that the overall number of Roseate Spoonbill nests in the Everglades watershed was more than 60 percent lower than wildlife officials had set as a threshold for the Spoonbill's recovery. A copy of the report can be found here on the Web page for the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force (SFERTF).

Wood Stork is one Indicator of our Wetlands’ Health

I'm always glad to see one of these endangered wading birds gliding overhead. These graceful birds are an indicator of the health of our natural environment here in South Florida. I was hiking along when I looked up just in time to catch the striking white and black plumage of this Wood Stork gliding above like a plane. Wood storks were listed on the Federal Endangered List in 1984. Their low population size ...

Posted at June 09, 2011 by Comments Off

How Glades Restoration Would Impact One Snail-Loving Hawk

This is the first in the Quirky Flamingo's series on how Everglades Restoration would change the wildlife and landscape of South Florida's River of Grass. The Everglades Snail Kite would probably be one of the first species to benefit directly from efforts to return the Everglades to its natural flow. When—or if—political and budgetary hurdles are cleared, and Everglades restoration plans come to fruition, the Everglades Snail Kite would soon see an upward turn in its population of less than 800 adults.

Posted at May 23, 2011 by Comments Off

Sun setting at Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge

The thick clouds draped over the horizon have made for some wonderful Galdes sunsets the past few days. It was a little cooler, dropping down a few temps as the sun dropped.  Of course early evening is the best time to see wildlife, and up in the dusk sky I spotted an Everglades Snail Kite, Pileated Woodpecker, Red-headed Woodpecker, and dozens of herons and bitterns, as ...

Posted at May 19, 2011 by Comments Off